Computing & Business Studies

Meet the Curriculum

  • Mrs Franks - Faculty Director of Computing and Business
  • Miss Palmer - Assistant Headteacher and Business Studies & Computing Teacher
  • Ms Smith - Key Stage 4 Coordinator for ICT and Film Studies & Computing Teacher
  • Mrs Capewell - Curriculum Leader of Business Studies & Computing Teacher
  • Mr Lowe – Key Stage 3 Coordinator for Computing & Computing Teacher

What Will We Learn?

Students in Year 7, 8 and 9 have two 50-minute lessons each week where they will cover a range of topics involving a combination of Computer Science, Information Technology and Digital Literacy. Each module is formally assessed at the end of each Term.

In Key Stage Four, the Computing Department offers GCSE Computer Science and Vocational ICT. GCSE Computer Science is recognised as an English Baccalaureate subject. Students also have the opportunity to study Business and/or Film Studies.

Key Stage 3

Year 7

The Key Stage 3 Computing curriculum is modular. During Year 7 the following modules or units are studied:

  1. Living in a Digital World
  2. Computational Thinking and Data Representation
  3. Project Based Programming and Digital Artefact Design

All modules are formally assessed using levels. Students submit work electronically and receive assessment feedback through the Google Classroom.

The Computing Curriculum has been designed to allow students to learn how to creatively solve problems using technology.

Year 8

The Key Stage 3 Computing curriculum is modular. During Year 8 the following modules or units are studied:

  1. Data Representation and Programming Sub-routines/li>
  2. Computer Systems
  3. Data Analysis and Digital Artefacts

All modules are formally assessed using levels. Students submit work electronically and receive assessment feedback through the Google Classroom.

The Computing Curriculum has been designed to allow students to learn how to creatively solve problems using technology.

Year 9

The Key Stage 3 ICT curriculum is modular. During Year 9 the following modules or units are studied:

  1. Representing Algorithms and Using Presentation Software
  2. Searching and Sorting Algorithms and Using Word Processing Software
  3. Purposeful Programming Techniques and Using Spreadsheets

All modules are formally assessed using levels. Students submit work electronically and receive assessment feedback through the Google Classroom.

The Computing Curriculum has been designed to allow students to learn how to creatively solve problems using technology.

Key Stage 4

The course is broken down into two components:

Component 1 - Paper 1: Computational thinking and problem-solving

A mix of multiple choice, short answer and longer answer questions assessing a student’s practical problemsolving and computational thinking skills.

What's assessed:

Computational thinking, problem solving, code tracing and applied computing as well as theoretical knowledge of computer science from subject content 1–4 above.

How it's assessed:
  • Written exam set in practically based scenarios: 1 hour 30 minutes
  • 80 marks
  • 40% of GCSE
Component 2 - Paper 2: Written assessment

A mix of multiple choice, short answer, longer answer and extended response questions assessing a student’s theoretical knowledge.

What's assessed:

Theoretical knowledfe from subject content 3-7 above

How it's assessed
  • Written exam: 1 hour 30 minutes
  • 80 marks
  • 40% of GCSE
Component 3 - Non-exam assessment

The development of a computer program along with the computer programming code itself which has been designed, written and tested by a student to solve a problem. Students will produce an original report outlining this development.

What's assessed?

The non-exam assessment (NEA) assesses a student's ability to use the knowledge and skills gained through the course to solve a practical programming problem. Students will be expected to follow a systematic approach to problem-solving, consistent with the skills described in Section 8 of the subject content above.

How it's assessed
  • Report: totalling 20 hours of work
  • 80 marks
  • 20% of GCSE
Subject Content

Computing Fundamentals is the theory element of the course and covers 39 topics relating to Computer Science. These are:

  • Representing Algorithms
  • Efficiency of Algorithms
  • Searching Algorithms
  • Sorting Algorithms
  • Data Types
  • Programming Concepts
  • Arithmetic Operations in a Programming Language
  • Relational Operators in a Programming Language
  • Boolean Operations in a Programming Language
  • Data Structures
  • Input/Output and File Handling
  • String Handling in a Programming Language
  • Random Number Generation in a Programming Language
  • Subroutines (Procedures and Functions)
  • Structured Programming
  • Robust and Secure Programming
  • Classification of Programming Languages
  • Number Bases
  • Converting Numbers between Bases
  • Units of Information
  • Binary Arithmetic
  • Character Encoding
  • Representing Images
  • Representing Sound
  • Data Compression
  • Hardware and Software
  • Boolean Logic
  • Software Classifications
  • Systems Architecture
  • Network Types and Topologies
  • Common Network Protocols
  • Network Security
  • TCP/IP Model
  • Fundamentals of Cyber Security
  • Cyber Security Threats
  • Social Engineering
  • Malicious Code
  • Methods to Detect and Prevent Cyber Security Threats
  • Ethical, legal and environmental impacts of digital technology on wider society, including issues of privacy

All students are expected to develop their programming skills at home or using Open Access to ensure that they are prepared for the Controlled Assessment tasks.

Recommended websites for studying programming are listed below:

Computing Textbook - www.computingtextbook.co.uk

Code Academy - www.codecademy.com

Code Avengers - www.codeavengers.com

Khan Academy - www.khanacademy.org

Geek Gurl Diaries - www.geekgurldiaries.co.uk

Vocational ICT - Cambridge National in Information Technologies

The collection and communication of data and storing of data/information happens all around us. Technology underpins how it’s collected and communicated nearly all the time. It can be seen in all walks of life, from a wearable fitness tracker recording how many steps you have taken, mobile phone providers recording individual’s usage to create a bill or an online retailer being able to target you with specific promotions based on your purchase history. Knowing how and why data is gathered and being able to turn raw data into something meaningful is essential as students move through education and into employment. To be able to do this students will need to have the confidence to use a range of information technology that is currently available, as well as being adaptable and resilient enough to deal with the rapid advances.

This qualification will teach students what different technologies could be used, why they should use them and how to make best use of them, to gather, store, manipulate and present data; this is known as data management. Students will learn about tools and techniques for use in different digital hardware and software technologies, and how these can be integrated to create digital solutions to manage and communicate data and information. They will also be taught what data and information are and the legal, ethical and moral considerations when using technology to gather, store and present data and information, and how to mitigate the risks of cyber-attacks. Through this qualification they will be able to select and use the most appropriate technology safely and effectively, to complete a data management task such as a cable TV provider monitoring customers’ viewing to make recommendations for additional packages in the customer’s subscription. They will also learn to follow a project life cycle of initiation, planning, execution and evaluation to complete a data management task and use their skills, knowledge and understanding of technology to complete each of the phases of the project lifecycle. The skills, knowledge and understanding they will develop through this qualification are very relevant to both work and further study.

The course is assessed by an external examination and an internal assessment; both are worth 50% of the final grading.

Film Studies GCSE 9-1

Film is an important part of many people's lives. Those who choose to study it characteristically bring with them a huge enthusiasm and excitement for film which constantly motivates them in their studies. They experience a powerful medium which inspires a range of responses from the emotional to the reflective as they are drawn into characters, their narratives and the issues films raise. The root of that power is the immersive audio-visual experience film offers – one which can exploit striking cinematography, composition and locations as well as powerful music and sound. It is not surprising that many consider film to be the major art form of the last hundred years and that many feel it important to study a medium which has such a significant influence on the way people think and feel.

The WJEC Eduqas specification in GCSE Film Studies is designed to draw on learners' enthusiasm for film and introduce them to a wide variety of cinematic experiences through films which have been important in the development of film and film technology. Students will develop their knowledge of US mainstream film by studying one film from the 1950s and one film from the later 70s and 80s, thus looking at two stages in Hollywood's development. In addition, they will be studying more recent films – a US independent film as well as films from Europe, including the UK, South Africa and Australia.

Production is an important part of this specification and is integral to a students' study of film. Studying a diverse range of films from several different contexts is designed to give students the opportunity to apply their knowledge and understanding of how films are constructed to their own filmmaking and screenwriting. This is intended to support learners in producing creative films and screenplays as well as enable their production work to provide an informed filmmaker's perspective on their own study of film.

The academic study of film is now well established and the frameworks for its study are broadly similar whether at GCSE, AS, A level or at higher education institutions.

  • the ways in which meanings and responses are generated through film
  • a contrasting, culturally diverse range of films from different national contexts
  • film as an aesthetic medium
  • how films reflect the social, cultural and political contexts in which they are made
  • the relationship between film and film technology over time. In addition, the specification aims to enable learners to apply their knowledge and understanding of film to filmmaking or screenwriting.

Assessment for this course:

  • Two written examinations of 1hr 30 minutes each, sat on a separate occasions - 70% of final grading
  • One internal assessment - A screenplay/film of a set gere - 30% of final grading
Edexcel GCSE ICT

Students study two units for the single GCSE award. Unit 1 is theory based and is assessed by a written exam. Unit 2 is practical and is assessed by coursework.

Unit 1 content summary: Living in a Digital World:

This is a theory unit. In this unit students explore how digital technology impacts on the lives of individuals, organisations and society. Students learn about current and emerging digital technologies and the issues raised by their use in a range of contexts (learning and earning, leisure, shopping and money management, health and wellbeing, on the move). They develop awareness of the risks that are inherent in using ICT and the features of safe, secure and responsible practice.

Unit 2 content summary:

This is a practical unit. Students broaden and enhance their ICT skills and capability. They work with a range of digital tools and techniques to produce effective ICT solutions in a range of contexts. Students learn to reflect critically on their own and others’ use of ICT and to adopt safe, secure and responsible practice. They put into practice what they learn about digital technology in Unit 1 to produce their own ICT solutions.

Find out more information from your ICT teacher or visit www.edexcel.org.uk

Assessment

Unit 1 is assessed by a 90 minute written paper which is externally marked.

Unit 2 assessment Internally assessed under controlled conditions.

Controlled assessment is the replacement for coursework and the main difference is simply that your students now produce their work in school under your supervision within a specified amount of time. We will always give clear guidance on each element: task setting, task taking and task marking – so you’ll know exactly what to do.

A Controlled Assessment Brief (CAB) provided by Edexcel, is marked by teachers and moderated by Edexcel examiners. Students have 40 hours to work on the CAB.The CAB is an interactive onscreen document. It is Weighted 60% of the GCSE.

Progression Routes

Progression to Level 3, AS/A2 Level, BTEC Award, AVCE, NVQ3, Advanced Apprenticeship in related subjects, Access to HE

Preparing for External Exams

We recommend two text books; both are available from good bookshops or the school (at a much reduced cost!). The first book is called ‘Revise Edexcel GCSE ICT Revision Guide, and the second book is ‘Revise Edexcel GCSE ICT Workbook’. They are published by Pearson and both books are purple

Students should be encouraged to read the revision book and answer questions in the workbook. Both books are very ‘readable’. Material is presented on a topic in a two page spread, this format is ideal for ‘dipping into’ and revision. Try not to buy these books and then leave on a bookshelf unopened – encourage their use. We use these books and other materials in class at various times in Years 10 and 11. GCSE Bitesize Website is excellent for revision and testing in ICT. AND the exam board (Edexcel) websites have past exam papers and mark schemes. Please encourage students to use them.


Business Studies

Business Studies is taught in KS4. Students in Years 10 and 11 follow the BTEC Certificate in Business or the Edexcel GCSE in Business Studies.

The curriculum area is proud of the excellent examination successes achieved by the students in this subject which are consistently outstanding and above the school average.

In addition, the curriculum area has an excellent reputation in Enterprise competitions and quizzes in the local area.


Key Stage 3

Students take part in various Enterprise modules at KS3, this develops their knowledge and understanding of Business Enterprise. Students take part in a Playground Enterprise project in Year 8 and a Restaurant Enterprise project in Year 9.


Key Stage 4

Compulsary Units:

Enterprise in the Business World & Finance for Business


Optional units that will be covered on the course:

Promoting a Brand & Recruitment, Selection and Employment


Assessment

BTEC First Award (Equivalent to 1 GCSE): 75% coursework and 25% online assessment in Finance for Business.


Progression Routes:

Progression to Level 3, AS/A2 Level, BTEC Award, AVCE, NVQ3, Advanced Apprenticeship in related subjects, Access to HE.


GCSE Business Studies (9-1 new spec)

Content of course:

  • Theme 1 - Investigating Small Business
  • Theme 2 - Building Business

  • Theme 1 Investigating Small Business (50% of overall GCSE)

    Compulsory unit, externally assessed (Written examination: 1 hour 30 minutes).

    This unit contains five topics: Enterprise and entrepreneurship, Spotting a business opportunity, Putting a business idea into practice, Making the business effective, Understanding external influences on business.


    Theme 2 Building Business (50% of the overall GCSE)

    Compulsory unit, externally assessed (Written examination: 1 hour 30 minutes).

    This unit contains five topics: Growing the business, Making marketing decisions, Making operational decisions, Making financial decisions, Making human resource decisions.

    Progression Routes:

    Progression to Level 3, AS/A2 Level, BTEC Award, AVCE, NVQ3, Advanced Apprenticeship in related subjects, Access to HE.

    Content of Course:

    GCSE in Business Studies: Unit 1, Unit 2 and Unit 3


    Unit 1 Introduction to Small Business (25% of overall GCSE)

    Compulsory unit, externally assessed (External examination: 45 minutes, compulsory multiple-choice and objective test)

    This unit contains five topics: Spotting a business opportunity, showing enterprise, putting a business idea into practice, making the start-up effective and understanding the economic context.


    Unit 2 Investigating Small Business (25% of the overall GCSE)

    Compulsory unit, internally assessed, same content as Unit 1. This unit is internally assessed under controlled conditions.


    Unit 3 Building a Business (50% of the overall GCSE)

    Compulsory unit, Externally assessed (Written examination: 1 hour 30 minutes.)

    This unit contains five topics: Marketing, meeting customer needs, effective financial management, effective people management and the wider world affecting business.

    Progression Routes:

    Progression to Level 3, AS/A2 Level, BTEC Award, AVCE, NVQ3, Advanced Apprenticeship in related subjects, Access to HE.

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    Water Street
    Dudley
    West Midlands
    DY6 7AD

    Tel: 01384 296596